e-book The Treatment: The Story of Those Who Died in the Cincinnati Radiation Tests

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See our User Agreement and Privacy Policy. See our Privacy Policy and User Agreement for details. Published on Dec 6, SlideShare Explore Search You. Submit Search. Successfully reported this slideshow. We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime. Upcoming SlideShare. Like this presentation? Stephens based the report on Dr.

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Saenger and Dr. As part of his investigation of the Cincinnati Radiation Experiments, Senator Kennedy sought interviews with the patients, an effort resisted by Dr. Although initially fading from public eye after the termination of the DOD contract and the discontinuation of the Kennedy investigation, the Cincinnati Radiation Experiments resurfaced in November as a result of Eileen Welsome's investigative journalism in the Albuquerque Tribune.

Stephens, Martha (Thomas) 1937-

WKRC then aired a program featuring a debate between Stephens, who attacked the experiments, and Congressman David Mann, who defended the experiments and the Cincinnati General Hospital. Following this televised program was a tide of local press coverage which led to the Cincinnati Radiation Experiment's story being covered in the New York Times. Saenger's only public testimony on the experiments. The renewed publicity also prompted Martha Stephens and Laura Schneider, a graduate student at the University of Cincinnati, to investigate the identities of the patients and their family members.

In addition to the settlement, the trial demanded the creation of a memorial plaque for the patients of the Cincinnati Radiation Experiments. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. This article is an orphan , as no other articles link to it. Please introduce links to this page from related articles ; try the Find link tool for suggestions. May Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments The Human Radiation Experiments.

STEPHENS, Martha (Thomas) 1937-

Durham and London: Duke University Press. The New York Times. Retrieved Under the Radar: Cancer and the Cold War. Rutgers University Press. Psychology Press. Contested Medicine: Cancer Research and the Military. University of Chicago Press.

The Treatment: The Story of Those Who Died in the Cincinnati Radiati…

Hearing Testimony of Eugene Saenger. Military Radiation Research at the University of Cincinnati, Other editions. Enlarge cover. Error rating book. Refresh and try again. Open Preview See a Problem? Details if other :. Thanks for telling us about the problem.


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Return to Book Page. Preview — The Treatment by Martha Stephens. The Treatment is the story of one tragedy of medical research that stretched over eleven years and affected the lives of hundreds of people in an Ohio city. Thirty years ago the author, then an assistant professor of English, acquired a large set of little-known medical papers at her university. These documents told a grotesque story.

Cancer patients coming to the public h The Treatment is the story of one tragedy of medical research that stretched over eleven years and affected the lives of hundreds of people in an Ohio city. Cancer patients coming to the public hospital on her campus were being swept into secret experiments for the U. Of the ninety women and men exposed to this treatment, twenty-one died within a month of their radiations. In Ohio, major publicity ensued—at long last—and reached around the world.

Stephens uncovered the names of the victims, and a legal action was filed against thirteen researchers and their institutions. A federal judge compared the deeds of the doctors to the medical crimes of the Nazis during World War II and refused to dismiss the researchers from the suit. After many bitter disputes in court, they agreed to settle the case with the families of those they had afflicted. In a memorial plaque was raised in a yard of the hospital.

Who were these doctors and why had they done as they did? Who were the people whose lives they took? Who was the reporter who could not forget the story, the young attorney who first developed the case, the judge who issued the historic ruling against the doctors? Get A Copy.

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Other Editions 4. Friend Reviews. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about The Treatment , please sign up. Lists with This Book. Community Reviews. Showing Rating details. More filters. Sort order. Nov 05, Fishface rated it liked it Shelves: true-crime , doctor-bashing. This book not only takes you back to your old, half-f0rgotten Cold War paranoia; it takes it to a whole new level. This is the story of something the Pentagon was doing behind our backs.

That something combined the worst features of Nagasaki with Dr. Mengele's science lab, and they did it right here in the U. With all that said, this was a frustrating, unsatisfying read. The author really only hints at what she found out about this case over the years. She likes to summarize, not really This book not only takes you back to your old, half-f0rgotten Cold War paranoia; it takes it to a whole new level. She likes to summarize, not really draw us a picture of what went on.